Current Exhibitions


Hallowed Absurdities: Work by Theodore Waddell

January 14-May 7, 2017

Made of road kill, animal skulls, jawbones, pelts and skins, as well as body bags, bullets, tools and actual guns, the artwork in Hallowed Absurdities raises the issue of the use of guns in our society. With humor, irony and wit, Waddell's mixed media assemblages poke fun at gun collectors, question the ethics of competitive big game hunting and defend the equality of all life, be it human or animal.

First Saturday Event: March 3, 1-3 p.m.

Click here for details.

Artist Talk & Book Signing: March 3, 3 p.m.

Click here for details.

Organized by Yellowstone Art Museum, Billings, Montana.


Diversity in Cultures Through African Insights

January 10-June 11, 2017

In honor of Black History Month, Diversity in Cultures Through African Insights by artist Annelies Dykgraaf consists of woodblock and linocut prints using textile pattern designs and themes of West African folk tales and myths.

Dykgraaf was born and raised in Nigeria and is a founding member of the Jacksonville Consortium of African-American Artists. She has a BFA from Calvin College, studied in France through the Cleveland Institute of Art and has shown extensively throughout Florida.


Art on the Move - Youth Art Exhibition

January 14-February 5, 2017

License tag art from Marion County fifth-grade students. This annual exhibition is sponsored by Marion County Tax Collector.

This program inspires fifth grade art students to design their own specialty plate while learning about the practical application of license plate art and how Florida’s 100+ specialty license plates support worthy causes. Each school earns a share of over $16,000 provided by generous sponsors and 100 percent of the sale proceeds.

Opening Reception: January 21, 10:30 a.m. to noon


Power & Piety: Spanish Colonial Art

December 3, 2016-February 26, 2017

From the late 17th century until the 1820s, vast profits from cattle ranching and tropical crops turned Spanish American elites into some of the wealthiest people in the New World. The production and trading of religious art during this period was centered on high end pieces for churches, the local nobility, and the wealthy. Affordable and less refined artworks were produced in large numbers for the homes of people of lesser means. Painters, sculptors, gilders, silversmiths and cabinetmakers created pieces of the finest craftsmanship to compete with luxury goods imported from Europe. Through 56 paintings, sculpture, silver pieces, furniture, and other decorative devotional objects, this exhibition showcases a wide range of artistic production and the finesse of local masters, offering an exceptional opportunity to learn more about the daily life and religious practices of colonial Latin America.

Click here for information on an exhibition talk, January 20, 6 p.m.

From the Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Collection–a component of the Fundación Cisneros, founded to enhance the appreciation of art from Latin America. Co-organized by the Museum of Biblical Art, New York, and Art Services International, Alexandria, Virginia.

John James Audubon: The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America

November 12, 2016-January 22, 2017

In the 1830s, as renowned naturalist and artist John James Audubon (1785-1851) was completing the final plates for his monumental Birds of America series, he and his sons began to gather material for his second and equally ambitious undertaking. Planning to complete the definitive study of American wildlife, Audubon set out to document the animals of North America, and to present them in a format as impressive as he had used for his birds. The result of his years of field research, travel, and seemingly endless study was the Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America, the 19th century’s seminal work on American animals.

This exhibition presents 36 original large-format Audubon prints from the private collection of Mr. & Mrs. William H. Told, Jr. of New York, who have graciously donated their impressive collection to the Huntsville Museum of Art.


Patrick Dougherty: Stickwork
Fancy Free

Ongoing

With a bevy of volunteers, from Feb. 1-19 sculptor Patrick Dougherty (Chapel Hill, NC) designed and built a site specific sculpture out of Crepe Myrtle and Elm limbs. Titled Fancy Free, the artist was inspired to create a sculpture with a jogging, casual footprint that works in juxtaposition to the angular, linear quality of the Appleton’s building, windows and reflecting pool. He also drew inspiration from Marion County’s status as “Horse Capital of the World,” creating his series of huts to resemble the natural, easy gait of a horse, with the hut closest to the museum boasting a wild mane. Fancy Free will remain a part of the outdoor Sculpture Walk and Garden for approximately two years, until it naturally decomposes.

For more information on the artist and this project, click here.


Art of the Ancient World

ongoing

The Appleton presents a selection from our permanent collection of antiquities. Encompassing themes such as dining, warfare and daily life, this display invites viewers to experience the art of the ancient world through the eyes of those who lived it.

The antiquities collection includes more than 900 pieces, collected by Arthur Appleton and gifted by several other generous donors. Art of the Ancient World includes fine examples of Egyptian, Greek and Roman works along with others from neighboring ancient civilizations.