Current Exhibitions


Pardon Our Dust
While We make Some Exciting Changes

Pardon Our Dust While We Make Some Exciting Changes
Permanent Collection Galleries Closed Until Early March

Due to an HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) project, the permanent collection galleries are currently closed. The large Edith-Marie Appleton gallery featuring Rembrandt and the Jews , Rembrandt Revealed, and Folk Couture: Fashion and Folk Art is open, as well as the ARTSpace and Education Wing art classrooms, Rotunda and Appleton Store. Please enter through the Education entrance (to the right of the regular front entrance).

PLEASE NOTE: Approximately 75% of the museum is closed. This includes all of the permanent collection galleries (African, Asian, European, Pre-Columbian, etc.), as well as the lobby, courtyard and auditorium. We apologize for the inconvenience but encourage you to visit the special exhibitions, ARTSpace and Appleton Store pop-up shop.


Folk Couture: Fashion and Folk Art

February 3-April 29, 2018

Fashion has always found inspiration in unpredictable sources: art, life, history — there are no boundaries. In this spirit, Folk Couture: Fashion and Folk Art explores the relationship between inspiration and creation. 13 established and emerging designers have created original ensembles inspired by artwork in the American Folk Art Museum’s collection.

The exhibit, guest curated by Alexis Carreno, includes 15 original ensembles and 23 works of art from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum.

Organized by the American Folk Art Museum, New York, and circulated by the Huntsville Museum of Art, Alabama. The tour of this exhibition is supported in part by the Leir Charitable Foundations in memory of Henry J. & Erna D. Leir, the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, and with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts, a state agency.


Rembrandt and the Jews: The Berger Print Collection

January 20-March 18, 2018

Rembrandt and the Jews features a collection of 22 etchings by the Dutch master that explore the relationship between the artist and the Jewish residents of his Amsterdam neighborhood. Rembrandt’s legacy as an etcher is characterized by the new and innovative techniques he introduced to printmaking. He broke with longstanding, traditional depictions of biblical narratives; instead, Rembrandt added emotional and psychological depth to his subjects through expressive faces, dramatic body language, and his bold use of shadow and light.

Rembrandt and the Jews was organized by the Westmont Ridley-Tree Museum of Art at Westmont College, Santa Barbara, California.

Sponsored in part by Phil and Charlotte Rosenberg.


Rembrandt Revealed: Etchings from the collection of Dr. Robert and Mrs. Mariann McClary

January 20-March 18, 2018

Featuring ten etchings, the meticulous prints from the McClary's collection depict Rembrandt’s world — inhabited by golfers, physicians, print-sellers and beggars.


On the edge of the Florida Frontier:
Perspectives on Life at Fort King

January 17-April 8, 2018

This exhibition brings to life Fort King during the Seminole Wars, as well as the work of the Gulf Archaeology Research Institute to reconstruct and preserve this historic site.

The exhibition includes artwork, archaeological objects, photographs and historic reconstructions that highlight how the fort appeared to those who came into contact with it and how this site influenced the development of Florida and US history. As one of the key forts during the Second Seminole War (1835-1842), its principal purpose was to oversee the Treaty of Moultrie Creek, which aimed to relocate the Seminole Indians of Florida into a reservation in the center of the state. Fort King was to enforce the northern boundary of the reservation and as such, was a location of interaction between U.S. soldiers, settlers and Seminoles during a historically transformative period in history. When the U.S. government sought to relocate the Seminoles out West in disregard to the treaty, it was at Fort King that Osceola attacked and killed the Indian agent Wily Thomson and six others at the outbreak of hostilities in 1835.


Art on the Move
Youth Art Exhibition

January 16-February 7, 2018

License tag art from Marion County fifth-grade students. This annual exhibition is sponsored by Marion County Tax Collector.

This program inspires fifth grade art students to design their own specialty plate while learning about the practical application of license plate art and how Florida’s 100+ specialty license plates support worthy causes. Each school earns a share of over $16,000 provided by generous sponsors and 100 percent of the sale proceeds.