Current Exhibitions


Survival Architecture and the Art of Resilience

September 10-November 13, 2016

Science, technology, architecture and art converge to question the nature and purpose of survival within the context of climate change and natural disaster: How do we design and retrofit our built world to adapt to increased uncertainty, and do it affordably? How do we produce dwellings that have a full life-cycle of durability pre, during and post disaster?

In Survival Architecture, Art Works for Change invited visionary architects and artists to consider artistically interpretive solutions and prototypes for emergency shelter. Commissioned, large-scale and portable interactive architectural installations, models, photography and drawings open opportunities for discussion from the perspective of art, interdisciplinary collaborations, and the sociocultural relevance of emergency and survival housing in the age of climate change. Through invention, artistic playfulness, and innovation, artists explore materials, technology, culture and social activism. This exhibition was organized by Art Works For Change, Inc.,with generous support from the National Endowment for the Arts, and additional funding from Nathan Cummings Foundation.


John Raimondi: Drawing to Sculpture

August 6-October 30, 2016

With monumental works at more than 25 museums, nine colleges and universities, three airports, and dozens more public and private locations throughout the United States and Europe, John Raimondi’s sculptures are among the most prominent contemporary public artworks. While his sculptures are easy to spot – some rise more than 60 feet tall – the Appleton will be among the first venues to showcase the artist's dynamic preparatory drawings.

To learn more about the artist, click here.

The exhibition has been organized by the Boca Raton Museum of Art and curated by Marisa J. Pascucci, Curator of Collections. After closing at the Appleton, Drawing to Sculpture will travel to the San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts in late 2016.

Artist Talk
Tuesday, September 20, 6 p.m.


Patrick Dougherty: Stickwork
Fancy Free

Ongoing

With a bevy of volunteers, from Feb. 1-19 sculptor Patrick Dougherty (Chapel Hill, NC) designed and built a site specific sculpture out of Crepe Myrtle and Elm limbs. Titled Fancy Free, the artist was inspired to create a sculpture with a jogging, casual footprint that works in juxtaposition to the angular, linear quality of the Appleton’s building, windows and reflecting pool. He also drew inspiration from Marion County’s status as “Horse Capital of the World,” creating his series of huts to resemble the natural, easy gait of a horse, with the hut closest to the museum boasting a wild mane. Fancy Free will remain a part of the outdoor Sculpture Walk and Garden for approximately two years, until it naturally decomposes.

For more information on the artist and this project, click here.


Art of the Ancient World

ongoing

The Appleton presents a selection from our permanent collection of antiquities. Encompassing themes such as dining, warfare and daily life, this display invites viewers to experience the art of the ancient world through the eyes of those who lived it.

The antiquities collection includes more than 900 pieces, collected by Arthur Appleton and gifted by several other generous donors. Art of the Ancient World includes fine examples of Egyptian, Greek and Roman works along with others from neighboring ancient civilizations.